Louise Weseth Releases Woodlands EP

Last week I brought you the title track from Louise Weseth‘s Woodlands EP, and today, I just want to give her an extra bump, as the EP is officially out today. The entirety of the EP seems to match the title, taking on this sort of woodland creature brand of folk, then mixing it with dreamy arrangements that build texture throughout each little track. For instance, “Retrograde” opens with this great light strum and Weseth’s voice, then you hear faint piano tinkering, and the song gradually begins to swell with emotion as the song even builds in some distant percussion; the arrangements make for a marvel track after track. This feels like a great day to wrap up your week, letting your mind drift off into the weekend.

Vern Matz Share Getting Older, Drop New LP

Last year we stumbled into Vern Matz, and we were really grateful for their mellow guitar pop. It’s simplicity proved the power of the songwriting, with little need for extra brush strokes, and it seems that we get the much of the same on the newest release, Strange Songs from a Lifetime of Unfinished iPhone Demos. The name hints at the tunes being unpolished, and perhaps even incomplete, but you wouldn’t be able to tell that listening through the strumming and little atmosphere lurking in the background. If you’re settling in for the day, as the blistering whether lurks outside, then perhaps you should settle down with this new album; it’s sure to warm you right up!

Tim Wilds Shares Debut Single

This pandemic is fucking with my head. One moment, I’m sitting there, you know, contemplating and what not. Then I’m off ready to run and rock. With this track from Tim Wilds, I think it’s perfect for the first state. It opens with quietly picked notes; you can hear Wild’s slide his hand up and down the neck of the guitar changing notes. When Tim comes into the picture with his voice, it offers deepened tones, calming as he carries syllables into the next. There’s something so narrative in the presentation, as if the song is some newspaper boat set adrift on a small stream, carried by Wilds’ voice. Something gentle to set your mind at peace.

 

More New Music from the Little Hands of Asphalt

Every few weeks (two to be exact) Fika Recordings shares new music with us from the forthcoming Little Hands of Asphalt LP. Last time out, I think I finally clicked on why I love the way Sjur crafts his songs, even going so far as to compare the tunes to my favorite John K. Samson. Here, there’s one track that still has that inclination, but on “Writing About Music,” there’s great arrangement work that really builds on the song’s emotional pull; I love how it’s almost broken down to bare bones before bounding off with buoyant strings and rolling drum work to close the song out. We’re still about a month away from the March 27th release date of Half Empty, and I’m every bit as excited…hope you are too!

Fresh Music from Holding Hands

We took off at the tail end of last week, but one thing I was listening to was the latest release from Montreal’s Holding Hands, Exile. First, all proceeds from the release go to the Native Women’s Shelter of Montreal, so please be sure to throw what you can spare that way. Second, I’d probably stick around this song for the chorus alone; it has that familiar feel to it, that place that in music that just makes you feel like you’ve been welcomed home. In the end, the song takes up this casual jam, illustrating the craft in the songwriting, but of course, you were already hooked by the balladry up front, eh? Keep on listening here friends.

Folk Number from Lucy Roleff

When I think of Lost and Lonesome, I think of the finest purveyors of pop music in Australia (well, one of). But, like ourselves, they have broad stretching tastes, and today they share a new track from folk songwriter Lucy Roleff. Upon my first few listens, I marveled at her voice; it has this ability to rise and almost quiver as it reaches higher notes, yet always controlled and personable. Great voices, however, need a little extra something sometimes, like the glorious arrangements that give this almost a woodsy feel. Left Open in a Room will be out on May 15th for all to enjoy.

Please to Meet You Sweet Whirl

A great deal of my childhood was spent listening to my father’s folk collection, and perhaps that, more than any other memory, will be our legacy. I mention this as Esther Edquist aka Sweet Whirl seems steeped in the rich history of folk music; her powerful voice has this faint quiver in it, something that reminds me of Harris or Baez. The track’s arrangement definitely aid to the songs depth, though those bits seem careful to stay out of the way when necessary. It’s a striking voice, and, for me, a striking introduction to the newest Australian export to land on Chapter Music; the label will release Love Songs & Poetry on May 3rd.

Soft Folk from Ian Wayne

Spent the great deal of this morning on the heavier side of shoegaze, so lets pull back a little as the wintry weather creeps in by spending some time with Ian Wayne. Ian’s vibe kind of reminds me of the middle ground between recently popular acts like Twain and Hovvdy; it offers a gentle vision that will appeal to fans of the delicate side of indie rock. It’s the perfect sort of tune for just staring blankly off into space, accepting the world that surrounds you as the notes seep into your skin. This song features on Ian’s new album, A Place Where Nothing Matters, which just dropped last week!

Yet Another Gem From Paul Bergmann

Leeds, Massachusetts based songwriter Paul Bergmann has received an enormous amount of praise on our website over the last few years. Seriously, Nathan and I love this guy’s music. After releasing his Night, Unfold EP last February, Bergmann is treating us fans with this new one off single called “Death of Me”. In simplest of terms, this song is absolutely beautiful.

Folk Number from Ella Grace

While Ella Grace is fairly new to the music scene, her latest single illustrates an attention to detail oft overlooked in this genre. For one, her British vocal inflection has something that always draws me to musicians from that side of the pond, but I really like the understated touches. You can hear her hand sliding across the fretboard, the faintest sound that provides an intimate connection between musician and listener. Then, there’s a distant supporting vocal, whispering from the far off. It’s a charming little ditty, with a little bit of spiritual catharsis in the lyrics…so keep Ella G on your radar.

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